Sep 062013
 

You know how there are people who get talked about a lot and then there are people who actually do a lot?

It strikes me that the same could be said of cities. And I’d put Chicago near the top of any list of cities that have done a lot. From an East Coast view, or West, it can appear that Chicago is the middle of nowhere. In this week’s podcast, we make the argument that Chicago is, in fact, the middle of everywhere.

The episode features Thomas Dyja, the author of several books, most recently The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream. He talks about 10 things that Chicago gave the world, some of them surprising and some just forgotten. Dyja isn’t arguing that Chicago is still in its heyday — it is almost certainly not — but he make a persuasive case that it is underappreciated on many dimensions, and that the world would be a very different place if Chicago hadn’t been so busy being Chicago.

Stephen DUBNER: When I say “Chicago,” you say…

MAN: Hot dog.
WOMAN: Jazz.
WOMAN: Deep dish.
MAN: Sausages.
MAN: Da Bears.
WOMAN: Slaughterhouses.
WOMAN: Windy City.
WOMAN: Stinky cabbage.
MAN: White Sox.
WOMAN: Cubs
WOMAN: Oh, Second City, of course.
WOMAN: Cold weather.
WOMAN: The ‘L’.
WOMAN: BLT pizza.

 

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